Home News NYPD veteran officers angry over having to pay for newer guns being...

NYPD veteran officers angry over having to pay for newer guns being issued to rookies

205
0
SHARE
In this July 25, 2016 photo provided by the New York Police Department, Jamal Skinner, left, and Evan Aronowitz, patrol officers with the 84th Precint, model ballistic body armor and helmets during a news conference at the 84th Precinct in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The NYPD plans to distribute 20,000 helmets and 6,000 vests before the end of the year. The equipment will be issued to uniformed patrol officers at a time when the NYPD is also encouraging them to be more approachable to law-abiding citizens. (NYPD via AP).
In this July 25, 2016 photo provided by the New York Police Department, Jamal Skinner, left, and Evan Aronowitz, patrol officers with the 84th Precint, model ballistic body armor and helmets during a news conference at the 84th Precinct in the Brooklyn borough of New York. The NYPD plans to distribute 20,000 helmets and 6,000 vests before the end of the year. The equipment will be issued to uniformed patrol officers at a time when the NYPD is also encouraging them to be more approachable to law-abiding citizens. (NYPD via AP).

Veteran NYPD officers are feeling a little animosity towards their rookie counterparts who are being issued newer handguns, while the old-timers are forced to foot the bill if they want an upgrade.

July NYPD Police Academy recruits were issued Generation 4 Glock 17s in July, resulting in the new bloods being issued the pistols that they learned to shoot and qualify with.

While Generation 4 Glock 17 sports little differences with the current Glock 17s in NYPD service (added grip texture, modular back straps, a different guide rod and a larger magazine release button), more senior officers of the NYPD feel that the newer models could help them shoot better and that they should not have to pay for an upgrade.

ezgif-com-video-to-gif-3

“If the Glock 17 can help us shoot better, that increases our safety,” one NYPD officer told the New York Post. “I personally believe the department should help out in paying for the new gun, or, at least, provide an even swap. Not everybody has $525 on hand to make a purchase like that.”

While the NYPD has not traditionally been known for stellar marksmanship in recent years, the officer’s claim of ergonomic changes making the gun (and therefore the shooter) more accurate seems to be a circulating theory among even higher-ranking NYPD officers.

“It’s the ergonomics of this gun .?.?. that makes this a better gun,” said Inspector Raymond Caroli, commander of the NYPD firearms and tactics section, who said that the more seasoned officers can buy their own if they want them badly enough.

While the NYPD have issued previous-generation Glock 17s for years, they also issue the smaller (more concealable) Glock 19 and the Sig Sauer P226, both known for their ease of use and combat-grade-or-better accuracy.

However, much of the issue with NYPD marksmanship likely lies less in grip texture and more in the unfortunate fact that the city mandated 12-pound triggers for all models of NYPD service pistols, including the P226 (which was converted from a smooth Double Action/Single Action to a clunky variant of Double Action Only). The complaint -and its results in the field- have been well-documented over the years and are often put into consideration when things go awry for New York’s Finest.

Another issue for NYPD rests in the magazine capacity restrictions set in place, which restrict the Glock 17’s 17-round magazine to only 15 rounds.

“Half the class laughed when the instructor said that,” one officer said as he described a training trip to the range where an instructor explained the 15-round limit. “Good ol’ NYPD, they’re restricting us yet again, only handing out the 15 option.”

Another officer expressed equal disdain for the magazine restriction.

“Why would you select a firearm that can hold 17 rounds, but then only allow 15 to be carried?” he asked rhetorically. “It defies common sense. Officers may need those rounds if they find themselves in an active-shooter situation like Dallas or Orlando.”

© 2016 Bright Mountain Media, Inc. All rights reserved. The content of this webpage may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written consent of Bright Mountain Media, Inc. which may be contacted at [email protected], ticker BMTM.

If you have any problems viewing this article, please report it here.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here