Home News Commitment to law enforcement, rejection of BLM narrative helped drive Trump’s election

Commitment to law enforcement, rejection of BLM narrative helped drive Trump’s election

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FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 file photo, President-elect Donald Trump smiles as he arrives to speak at an election night rally, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
FILE – In this Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016 file photo, President-elect Donald Trump smiles as he arrives to speak at an election night rally, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

One week after the presidential election, theories abound about how someone like Donald Trump could have made it to the White House.  The author of “The War on Cops” offers one explanation.

Heather Mac Donald, a contributing editor of City Journal, believes the Black Lives Matter movement helped drive Trump‘s ascent to the Oval Office. Even going back to the first presidential debate with Hillary Clinton, Trump noted that “right now, our police, in many cases, are afraid to do anything.”

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As police officers started backing off of proactive policing- for fear they’d be labeled racist- black lives in places like Chicago and Baltimore were being taken at record and near-record numbers. Only Trump expressed concern about the growing homicide toll in black neighborhoods, Mac Donald wrote, and in his victory speech, the president-elect promised to “fix our inner cities.”

Trump promised that if he became president, the crime and violence that today afflicts our nation would come to an end. “Beginning on January 20th, 2017, safety will be restored,” he said. He also repeatedly promised to put an end to the ‘false narrative’ about police that was leading to higher homicide rates and urban riots.

In an October 2016 Gallup poll, “the percentage of respondents expressing a “great deal” of respect for the police had surged to its highest level since 1967 — 76 percent.” Mac Donald writes that one of the things that led to this sharp increase was the rejection of the BLM narrative “that was killing cops and civilians alike.”

Despite Trump’s victory, the movement is not going to go quietly and may even grow more extreme, Mac Donald believes. It is “fueled by a university culture devoted to racial victimology,” she writes.

“But the absence of an echo chamber in the White House for such falsehoods may go far toward curbing rising violence.”

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